empedocles

Empedocles of Acragas (492-432 BC)

" Empedocles believed that light travelled with a finite velocity, not through any experimental evidence, of course, but simply through reasoning. Aristotle writes in De sensu :

Empedocles says that the light from the Sun arrives first in the intervening space before it comes to the eye, or reaches the Earth. This might plausibly seem to be the case. For whatever is moved through space, is moved from one place to another; hence, there must be a corresponding interval of time also in which it is moved from the one place to the other. But any given time is divisible into parts; so that we should assume a time when the sun's ray was not as yet seen, but was still travelling in the middle space. " (source: st-andrews.ac.uk)

Aristotle himself found it difficult to conceive a speed fast enough to account for the apparent instantaneous propagation of light across the horizon.
aristotle

Aristotle (384-322 BC)

" The thought of Aristotle (384-322 BC) dominated western science for nearly two millenia. So powerful is his cosmology that it compels him to declare that `` light is due to the presence of something, but it is not a movement'' [6]. No movement, no speed. And if that were not enough, the argument for finite speed is easily dismissed:

Empedocles (and with him all others who used the same forms of expression) was wrong in speaking of light as `travelling' or being at a given moment between the earth and its envelope, its movement being unobservable to us; that view is contrary both to the clear evidence of argument and to the observed facts; if the distance traversed were short, the movement might have been unobservable, but where the distance is from extreme East to extreme West, the strain upon our powers of belief is too great. [5]

[5] Aristotle. On the Soul. In Jonathan Barnes, editor, The Complete Works of Aristotle: The Revised Oxford Translation, Volume 1, pages 641-692. Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1984. Translated by J.A. Smith.
[6] Aristotle. Sense and Sensibilia. In Jonathan Barnes, editor, The Complete Works of Aristotle: The Revised Oxford Translation, Volume 1, pages 693-713. Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1984. Translated by J.I. Beare. "
(source: uwaterloo.ca)